Read all about it: digital public affairs in print

July 11, 2008 at 3:35 pm 5 comments

If you’re looking for an overview of our (my) world view in terms of how digital and public affairs fit together, then have a read of this article. Originally available in the “strategy and practice” (!) section of the print version of the online movers and shakers and events website (e.g. it’s a bit like “Hello” magazine for Brussels). The publishers have kindly agreed to allow us to put a pdf version up on this blog.

Thoughts, reflections and rotten vegetables; all are most welcome in the comments section of this post.

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Entry filed under: public affairs. Tags: , , , , , , .

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5 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Jon Worth  |  July 11, 2008 at 4:25 pm

    Thaks for the link to whodoicall.eu 🙂

    Jan and I are cooking up a few new campaigns in a similar vein, while in the UK my atheist bus campaign is going strong.

    Reply
  • […] A note drops in the inbox from Mark Senak of our D.C. office to tell us that we are not the only FHers to have churned out thinkpieces on the use of new media in public affairs. […]

    Reply
  • 3. Teri  |  July 17, 2008 at 10:32 pm

    Reading your piece, as well as Mark Senak’s, I think, shows great promise. Whatever the definition of public affairs is (and I agree, it is some nebulous definition at best), the internet is allowing government officials to move into greater dialogue with their constituents…I think, elevating public affairs (at least in part) to the ideal that it should be.

    Reply
  • 4. fhbrussels  |  July 24, 2008 at 6:26 pm

    Thanks Teri, we’d agree with your noble sentiments. We’d like it to continue here in Brussels and to be part of it from a professional and personal standpoint.

    James

    Reply
  • […] to it. It is also not the most beautiful presentation ever created. This said, please check out the article I wrote that sums up in prose some of what I said in person. Alternatively, pass by for a coffee if you are […]

    Reply

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A blog on politics, policy, public affairs and communications in Brussels and the European Union. The blog is written by the team at Fleishman-Hillard in Brussels. Views expressed are personal and do not reflect those of the company or its clients. You will find the contact details of our team at www.fleishman-hillard.eu

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